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  Tree Planting

In recent years, tree planting projects have been a joint undertaking between the Environment and Parks and Solid Waste Services Divisions.  Many trees have been installed in City parks and open space areas, to ensure that residents and visitors can continue to enjoy the urban forests, in spite of the many pine trees that were removed in the wake of the mountain pine beetle infestation.

For tree planting information, please click on the following:

  1. Planting Trees on City Property
  2. Tree Planting
  3. Tree Selection
  4. Downtown Street Trees
  5. Native & Riparian Tree Planting

For specific information of tree planting techniques, information is available through the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) at www.treesaregood.com


Planting Trees on City Property

Prior to the planting of a tree on municipal property, residents must get permission from the City’s Urban Forestry representative.  Trees growing on City property are owned by the City regardless of who planted them.  As well, pruning or planting of City-owned trees is not permitted by anyone other than city staff or contractors.

City Arborists along with other local experts have created a recommended Boulevard, Natural Area & Residential Area Tree List.  The City Parks and Solid Waste Services Division is continually testing additional trees for hardiness and other suitable attributes.  Over time, as a result of this testing there may be additional trees added to the list.  Occasionally a tree species or cultivar is removed from the list.  This is almost always because of a newly introduced or identified pest or disease, or the anticipated arrival of a pest or disease.

Trees planted on City property are all planted in accordance with the City of Prince George standards and regulations (see Residential Tree Planting Offset Standard).  Trees are also planted to International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) specifications, which are accepted planting standards world wide.  For information on these standards, visit the ISA website at www.treesaregood.com.

Residents can also sponsor a tree in a City Park through the Adopt-A-Tree Program

 

Tree Planting

Recommended tree planting standards follow those outlined by the International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) at www.treesaregood.com.  This planting method is recommended for use by residents planting trees on their own property as well.  Additional tree planting information is also illustrated by Bonnie Appleton for Tree Planting and Planting Trees and Shrubs.

Mulching of tree wells is also highly recommended and should not be underestimated as a required component of correct tree planting practices. You may notice City crews installing mulched tree wells under existing trees throughout Civic facilities and Parks.  Mulching with organics provides the benefits of:

  1. Reduced watering requirements
  2. Weed control
  3. Insulation for roots
  4. Improved soil aeration, structure and drainage
  5. Soil fertility
  6. Inhibiting certain plant diseases
  7. Reduced mechanical damage
  8. Aesthetic and uniform landscaping

This added investment provides a magnitude of benefits for the caretaker both economically and labour-wise, while also providing the right environment to promote tree health and reduced mortality.  For recommended mulching standards, visit the ISA website at www.treesaregood.com.

 

Tree Selection

The tree you purchase is a lifetime investment. Selecting the right tree for the right place can save time, money, and later disappointment.  Before you decide what to plant, decide where to plant (see Right Tree/Right Location by Bonnie Appleton).  Let the planting location dictate the tree species you select.  Take the time to investigate your site and invest in your tree wisely.

Recommended tree species lists for the Prince George area are available for Boulevard, Natural Area & Residential Areas as well as for Downtown Street Trees.

Downtown Street Trees

To enhance the appearance of City streets, the Parks and Solid Waste Division in partnership with downtown businesses are participating in a cooperative Street Tree Program.  This program is designed to provide trees in front of businesses on a cost sharing basis.  This program started in 1990 with 40 trees installed on Victoria Street.  More recently trees have been installed on the boulevards between First and Third Avenues downtown.  As of 2007, a total of 315 street trees have been planted in the downtown area.

Downtown trees are monitored daily throughout the week to discover any new damage from vandalism, accidents, pests, or diseases.  With early detection and quick remedial action there is an improved opportunity for the tree’s recovery and continued health.  The success and failure of the various species of trees that were planted has been reviewed and used to create a list of Downtown Street Trees recommended for planting in such a harsh environment.  This list is unique to the downtown sidewalk planting conditions in Prince George and is available to landscape architects and other businesses requiring this specialized information.

Native and Riparian Plantings

Native trees are those that grow naturally within a region.  Native trees fit well in the home landscape, especially along streams or open areas, but might not be suitable for all sites and situations in urban areas.

Recommended tree species for natural areas in the Prince George area are available from the Boulevard, Natural Area & Residential Areas list.

*Information on native or semi-native plant species, native planting techniques and the creation or preservation of natural habitat areas, can be found on the Naturescape website.

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